Marvel 1602

Marvel 1602 by Neil Gaiman, Andy Kubert, &al, is something I’ve wanted to read for a long time and finally got a round tuit.

This was originally an 8 issue series, now available as a collected graphic novel. Apparently there’s been others created in the 1602 universe, but this is the core story. This is an alternate universe story about the main Marvel superheroes out of time, for some reason, which is eventually revealed. On the main, the cool part is the period drama and how the heroes have turned out in another time, and an extended thought experiment about this alternate reality in which essential natures and essential stories still play out.

I think for me the real feature that drew me to this story was that it featured Doctor Strange, and moreover in the era of John Dee, but it turns out there’s a lot more I enjoyed. Lots of little things that tickled my interests, like Daredevil talking about mystery and audere, Fury and Peter Parker talking about secrets, powers and mysteries, & c.

I think I was really hoping that Doctor Strange would use Dee’s obsidian mirror, but if it was there, even in the background, I missed it. But there’s plenty I found interesting. Two moments that come to mind are the villainization of libertarian, individual as the myopic measure of right Doom opposed to the excellence in a collective of the various others coming together, and an almost Zen parable about tools and weapons that resolves into an oblique takedown of filthy lucre.

On the other hand, I don’t think it ever occurred to me that the Fantastic Four could be seen as the four classical elements. I still don’t enjoy FF much, but it’s a dimension to them I’d not thought about before, that’s kinda obvious now that I’ve read it.

The art is in that almost over-perfect style that is hand-drawn but finished on a computer, which tweaks that peculiar Alex Ross-like trigger of glossy detail while still being minimal. The writing is good, though not stunning, to be honest. The primary novelty is in the time-twist and what-if-ism, which does deliver a solid series. Overall, worth reading and a fun adventure that kept me interested and thinking beyond just what the story presented.

Originally posted on my personal blog at Marvel 1602

First Sample Zendo Pieces

Andy Looney posted some pictures of the First Sample Zendo Pieces for the upcoming new release and … they aren’t all pyramids! What is this black magic?!

We’ve just passed a major milestone in the production of our new edition of Zendo: the first samples of actual pieces have arrived from the factory, and they look terrific!

Here are a bunch of photos, showing the pieces in various different arrangements. For size reference, the pyramid is the same size as a 2-pip piece from Pyramid Arcade.

I’m so excited to have these pieces in hand. After years of pondering options and trying out 3-D printed prototypes, it’s kind of amazing to have actual finished pieces in hand. They look so good, and they’re so much fun to stack up and play with!

The other elements of the game (box design, cards, rulebooks, etc.) are all done, so with the approval of the pieces, Zendo is officially at the printer. Woo-Hoo!

Also, consider that new shapes mean, wait for it … new game design options for Looney Pyramids! I’ll have a fully functional Sleestak pylon control panel now, for sure!

The Iron Oath

The Iron Oath crowdfunding effort by Curious Panda looks visually pixel-cool: “A gritty turn-based RPG with a focus on tactics and the management of your guild within a dynamic world.” I saw some of their images on Twitter and ended up checking them out, and just got word their campaign has started.

Write an article, review, or story for Odd Order

Interested in writing for Odd Order? Now you can!

I am announcing an open and rolling call for you to pitch ideas for submissions to Rigaroga’s Odd Order.

I recently created an online form which you can use to pitch your idea for a submission. Once you’ve got an idea that you feel is right for Odd Order’s audience, you’re ready to start. You should pitch your idea for a submission!

What happens next, you ask? What’s the process of moving from making a pitch, developing a submission, compensating you, and, finally, publishing your work for the public audience of the library to read? Well, I’m so excited you asked! Let me tell you!

The Pitch

When a pitch comes in, what I plan on doing is posting it to a private forum for my Patrons. I’ll do that to give them a chance to let me know what they think, and if they’re interested in reading the proposed submission. I’ll take their feedback into consideration on whether to accept or reject the pitch, and move forward with the idea as a submission.

If the pitch idea is not accepted, I’ll suggest whether or not to revise the submission for another try.

If the pitch is accepted, then I’ll ask the author to submit the article, review or story for further consideration.

The Submission

When a submission comes in, what I plan on doing is posting it to a private forum for my Patrons. I’ll do that to give them a chance to let me know what they think about the various merits of the submission. I’ll take their feedback into consideration on whether to accept or reject the pitch, and move forward with compensation for the author and then posting the submission to Rigaroga’s Odd Order blog.

If the submission is not accepted, I’ll suggest whether or not to revise the submission for another try.

If the submission is accepted, I’ll move forward with paying the author. Once I’ve successfully compensated the author for their work, I will then post the the article, review or story for the public to read on the blog.

Compensation

For submissions that are accepted for publication, I happily offer thanks. I’m also delighted to send a gratis download code for any one of the released anthology albums.

For work accepted to the blog, I currently offer an honorarium of $15/article. If you’re pitching a review, I offer and honorarium of $5/review or I am happy to see about getting a reviewer’s copy sent to you as your compensation instead.

Finally, if there’s something else you’ve got in mind, or an idea I’ve not mentioned, let me know!

 

If you have any comments, questions, or concerns, do get in touch. Also, if the process seems daunting or there’s some aspect of it that creates difficulty for you in some way, let me know so we can find a way forward that works better for you. Finally, if you’re thinking of something that doesn’t seem to fit what I’ve described here, get in touch and let me know what you’re thinking so we can figure out whether and how we can consider your cool out-of-the-box idea. Go ahead and use the form and fill out as much as you can and I’ll get back to you.

I look forward to hearing from you, so pitch your idea today! (Besides, you read this far, right? You might as well follow through with a pitch too!)