Letter from Rick & Morty party to Rick & Morty parties

Rigaroga intertable letter Rick and Morty party to Rick and Morty parties 3aug2022

Read aloud in a Morty voiceover for the party to hear whilst they read the note:

“Hey, dummies! Sorry you got stuck doing the lame rerun show, but here’s a little something to help you not screw it up this time.—With pity, from your past, original selves.”

Along with this note is a Potion of Lesser Healing and a set of mint-condition Funko Pop! figures matching each character in the party.

OOC

(This is an in-game scroll left behind by the characters from my D&D 5e Solo with Rick and Morty actual play series, at my table, to two parties of characters playing the same characters in the same box set, but at different tables and different times,. This is asynchronous intertable / crosstable play, all using the Dungeons & Dragons vs Rick and Morty box set from Wizards of the Coast.)

Simón Mijares commented on my
D&D 5e Solo – Rick and Morty – The Lost Dungeon of Rickedness: Big Rick Energy – Episode 0 video, asking about the old links to my D&D Beyond character sheets for the box set, which had been disabled when I cancelled by subscription. I suggested we talk in email about it.

In email, we talked more about running the adventure and I realized that, since I wasn’t using any characters I could just activate the Rick & Morty sheets for the characters I had been playing in the actual play. (I had been working on comic-accurate versions of each character in the box set as well as sheets for the various version of Rick, like Gee-Willikers Petalbutt, Winterblade, Wizard Rick, Wizard-Fighter Rick, and so on. But, I never finished those, and don’t have enough free active slots to make them active anyway!) So, at least for now, the links in the video description work again, but I also sent an archive of exported PDF sheets for all my characters and the included free-to-copy pregens from the box. (There’s actually some differences, including a spelling error in a character’s name and an incorrect stat, and some other things I had to figure out, if I recall.)

Since Simón was going to be running The Lost Dungeon of Rickedness for a couple groups I also suggested including the letter above for those parties to find. (That’s it up there, that letter above. If you’re looking for it here, you missed it. This is text. That’s a graphic, with text. Go back up. I’d say you can’t miss it, but you already did. I’ll wait.) It’s just a little gift from me, across time and across tables, to Simón’s players, and to you and yours if you want it too!? Out of character you can let them know that it was me that sent it, if you want, even point them to this page after they’re done with the adventure, or just make it a weird timey-wimey mystery, as you like. If you also use this, be sure to let me know how it goes!

So, there’s the letter and a useful potion but also some useless Funko Pop! figures for the party to fight over and, I mean, if they actually figure out an awesome use for them (players always be playin’ after all), I’d love to hear it, but I added them really just for the potential chaos of having them as a red herring for the players to wonder about.

By the by, Simón let me know: “I ran the game twice this weekend an it was a blast! The first group reached around half the map. The second just reached the third room. I guess since the 2nd group was in person, there were more interruptions than the usual audio/game issues that happen in online sessions. I used the cufuc table in both cases, got to look for it on the first room! First time, Marty’s hair fell off. Second time, 12! All your organs are replaced with bees, instant death, no save! So Keth was replaced with Keeth. The potion was very well received, and they are trying to figure out what the Funkos are for. Next week we will try to finish the dungeon, so I guess they enjoy it enough. In the name of both groups, thanks for your help!”

I wanted to post about this for two reasons that I am wont to champion and think are important. The first is having creative output to show for one’s efforts. The second is that this is an example of asynchronous inter-table play, where people play with others across space and time between tables. I talk a lot about both of those all the time, so I’ll just mention them by reference here.

Voyages Map 1 Solo Rigaroga 30jul2022

Voyages Map 1 Solo Rigaroga 30jul2022

Failed offline solo run through Map 1 of Voyages by Postmark Games, a roll & write sandbox nautical adventure game.

First try, no joy. In my defense, I didn’t realize, until too late, I had to actually sell cargo at the settlements to get the star for them, not just have them accumulated in my hold, though I still did manage to sell two once I figured that out. Other than that, I might have gotten a good score, but overall I spent too much of my limited time being a tourist seeing the sights, I suspect, instead of doing the things I was there to do. I think I was treating this too much like an open world, but there’s only a limited number of ways to get those stars, and so I’d probably best get to those from the start and for real next time.

Instant Message from Ragnar to Astrid

Starforged intertable correspondence Ragnar to Astrid 13jun2022

Rag:

Thanks for sending that info! GTG I’m stuck in a precursor server room!

Ast:

Yikes! Have you tried turning it off and on again?

OOC

(This is an in-game instant message sent from my character Ragnar in a co-op actual play to my Astrid, a character in my solo playthrough, at another table, so this is intertable / crosstable play, both using the Ironsworn: Starforged system.)

There’s not necessarily any in-game content or activity given in this exchange, just something funny. Though, I have the conversation available to me as character information, for both characters, which I can use, if it comes up.

Email from Astrid to Ragnar

Email from Astrid to Ragnar 5jun22

Hey, Rag!

I looked to see if I could find anything about precursor maps and vault configurations mentioned anywhere.

I did find a reference to Sanguis Pyre sector. There’s some kind of deep space structure there. It has a practical function of some kind, so I wonder if that might be the kind of thing you’re seeking. Might be related to your vault configurations!

I’ll send you what information I have about that so you can decide whether to check it out or not.

Good luck!

OOC

(This is an in-game letter sent from my Astrid, a character in my solo playthrough to my character in a co-op actual play, at another table, so this is intertable / crosstable play, both using the Ironsworn: Starforged system.)

I used d100 roles on the Sector Name, (Precursor) Location, (Precursor) Scale, and (Precursor) Form oracles to develop keywords to include in this email, and then riffed the rest based on where Ragnar’s table is at, right now. This is something that can be kept in reserve for use when a role on those tables might be needed next, or as the starter for a new plot line, whatever is most useful.

In conversation with streamer Dice T

I met streamer Dice T for the first time during an streamed online so-op session of Shawn Tompkin‘s Ironsworn: Starforged [Also]. In fact, I had also checked out his old Starforged module for Foundry VTT at one point in the past, before it became part of the new combined Ironsworn & Starforged module. You can check also out Dice T on YouTube, Twitter, Discord, and Mastodon. We recently had a conversation about all these things.

Take a moment to introduce yourself! Who are you?

Rigaroga Odd Order interview Dice T

My name is T. Yes, just the letter. Thank you, hippie parents. I am part jock, part punk, and entirely geek. I am a former IT professional and former tabletop game shop owner who simplified their life (“The Purge”) to free up as much time as possible to focus on the gaming world. I think I realized in my mid-40s that I was never going to outgrow gaming, so I decided to embrace it. This content/development side of things is entirely new to me.

Funny enough, my paternal grandfather had only an initial for his middle name, which became the initial of middle names for both my father and I. I never thought that might be at all common, but here we are with two cases! I don’t think I can come up with any others, can you? I mean, aside from fictional characters where their names aren’t fully revealed, or something.

Oddly enough, my brother sold new cars for Dodge/Jeep. He had someone come into the dealership about 10 years ago, buying a car, and his first name was T. He even sent me a picture of his driver’s license because he couldn’t believe it, himself. And it’s entirely possible that he was named T because someone that met me loved my name. I have no idea. But I can say that in my entire life, I can count on one hand how many times someone did not inquire about my name when hearing about it. But even funnier, my brother’s name is Jay. And yes, he got the full name with three whole letters. LOL.

Names are weird. I used to go by my middle name but in my late 20s I started going by my first name because I got tired of explaining my wacky middle name all the time to new people I’d rarely see again, as opposed to being a kid where I’d generally have at least a year with the same people in school.

When I stopped using my middle name, I ran into some strange issues that I’d never had before. There was one time I was flying from Phoenix, with a layover in Chicago, and then to Seattle. When I checked in at the kiosk, my ticket was entirely wrong, but I got it sorted, I thought. When I arrived in Seattle my luggage did not. Turns out there was another John Bell flying a few hours later that day on the same carrier from Phoenix, with a layover in Chicago, and then to Seattle. The kiosk had checked me in as this other person, and the carrier held my luggage back, thinking I was them, until their flight later that day!

Oh, yeah. Twitch wouldn’t authorize my affiliation because their form would not accept one-letter first names. I had to use my middle name. This is not the first time something like that has happened and it won’t be the last.

My middle name is Michael and there was a short time when I was starting high school when I considered going by my middle name, but that was really short-lived. I’ve grown to love the uniqueness of it, and “I pity the fool” who doesn’t.

Running a brick and mortar game shop seems like it’d be fun in the abstract, but I bet on paper it wasn’t. Anything brick and mortar, let alone something in a niche. Even in the beforetimes, there’s one actual shop I’ve been to in years, and it’s functionally at least a full day of travel there and back just to get there; and attending anything at night, like a game night, there would end up being an overnight hotel stay. But I doubt I’ll ever go there again. Just like I’ll probably never ever go to a cinema again. Not just because of contagion, though that’s a thing; but I’m just not into it at all.

There were a million other things I could have invested my money into doing that were more “guaranteed” a success, so yeah, I certainly didn’t do it to get rich. And there are a hell of a lot of people out there that think that if you own a business that you must be wealthy. That could not be further from the truth and for those four years I was open, I never worked harder in my life. But I wanted to build something to build a community around and to hopefully help bring some joy to their lives like they did for me. We had an amazing role-playing community, among others, and I loved being able to provide that place where people of all walks of life could come and share adventure. From the day the doors opened, it felt like the shop was there all along. I suspect that maybe even you would have found it worth the trip. :) I will share a couple pictures of it here.

Rigaroga Odd Order Interview Dice T Stomping Grounds Game Shop 1

Rigaroga Odd Order Interview Dice T Stomping Grounds Game Shop 2

Rigaroga Odd Order Interview Dice T Stomping Grounds Game Shop 3

How’d you get started tabletop gaming?

In the summer of 1979, a neighborhood friend introduced me to Dungeons & Dragons. We played Keep on the Borderlands over and over and over. My mother supported my new habit, and a regular trickle of D&D books would follow over the next several years. I played probably until my mid-twenties and took a hiatus for about 15 years, returning back to gaming in my late 30s or early 40s.

I got into it early too. Literally bought the AD&D Monster Manual when it came out, before anything else was available! Couldn’t even play yet because the other books weren’t out. Also had a huge hiatus before getting back into it, and then another long hiatus. All along I still, through it all, kept up on some of what was going on, and throughout all of it was mostly only ever doing ‘prep as play’ by myself. First time I played 5e was a couple years ago for the Spelljammer actual play I was streaming. Anyhow, it seems like there’s a lot of people who have been on long hiatus that come back to it. I have the sense that there’s a lot of that right now in 5e going on.

I think D&D owes a lot of its success to Critical Role. That stream made D&D “socially acceptable” and practically a household name. A lot of celebrities “came out” from their D&D closet in the wake of its success, and D&D was riding the huge wave of a board game revolution. A lot of people wanted to step away from their computer and console gaming and wanted to sit down with real people again. There was a genuine nostalgia for social gaming. That wave became a tsunami for D&D and it is as popular now as it has ever been. So yeah, there are the grognards like us who are coming back to it thanks to its resurgence, but D&D specifically is certainly overwhelmed by new players, which is a great thing for the hobby.

What do you personally get out of tabletop and gaming?

I love the joy it brings others, and I love finding ways to engage others’ imaginations. Some of my favorite memories were owning Stomping Grounds Game Shop, the community that was built, and the wonderful stories of human nature that derived from there. It was a home away from home for many people. So many people forged new friendships there, and in a couple of cases, it literally saved two individuals’ lives. I will always cherish it, and while the business ultimately had to close, the community that was built there was incredibly successful and rewarding to be a part of.

Community is a big deal. I’ve been in many, and, I suppose, always been seeking it out after a fashion. The tumultuous melodrama of the green room in high school and college Theatre was a big one for me. I had a BBS community that I was involved in that was tight knit and still, but less, tumultuous. And yet, each community I was in there were dysfunctional ideas I got from them that took a long time, in each case, to process and shed. But, there’s still that seeking it out that happens. I think a lot of people are trying to find that online, in social media now more than forums and things, and I think there’s a lot that can be said about how that doesn’t work well for anyone.

I touched on that a little earlier. There is a genuine human need for direct interaction. You just cannot replicate that in the online space. Sure, it’s a very nice convenience to be able to play whenever we like, but we truly like to sit down with each other and share stories and play games. We have literally done that as a species since our inception. You can tell a lot about a culture from the games that they play; and they all did in some way, shape, or form. I think the resurgence of tabletop games is based solely on that direct interaction. It’s a base necessity of ours.

So you worked on an Ironsworn: Starforged module for Foundry VTT, and recently combined effort with another module, that supports both Ironsworn and Starforged. How’d you get started on that?

I had just discovered Ironsworn and was already a Foundry owner. I was playing and hacking Ben Straub’s Ironsworn system when the Starforged Kickstarter hit, so I decided to venture into developing a system for it. I’m an amateur coder, at best, but it turned out pretty wonderful. It actually won a Foundry Jam award on itch.io last year, which was a nice outcome. But as I said, I am an amateur coder. I outkicked my coverage and just could not devote the time supporting it long-term. So Ben’s Ironsworn system is also the home for Starforged, and he incorporated several of the features of my system that made it special.

That’s pretty cool how it worked out, and glad that your work ended up living on instead of how many projects end up going fallow. We’re using the existing system in our co-op actual play, and it seems mostly there. I got into Foundry VTT because I thought it might help me as a solo player deal with the wild chaos of paper on my desk as I played. I was never going to be a terrain and minis person, except minimal or papercraft. (If you ever find I’ve painted a mini, I’ve been replaced by an alien.) But, a lot of what I might get from minis and terrain, but would never do, I thought I could do and have through using a VTT. I’ve ended up using it less than i thought I would, but I’ve used it in a few of my solo actual plays toward the end of when I was still streaming.

I was just talking about this with the Ironsworn Foundry community yesterday. The VTT space is truly perfect for solo play but there are just not a lot of systems made for VTTs that focus on that aspect. It’s actually a space that I am looking to explore with my work. And the fact that you can play the vast majority of these games co-op really does just add to the value of the games that are designed with solo play as a focus.

For me, I find I really dislike the big two VTT systems, for aesthetic and philosophical reasons, and was really enamored with the look and feel along with how Foundry VTT enabled both publishers and creators to do what they do without having to usuriously kickback a vig to the VTT. I also really, really like how when you buy a license to something you are paying the creator (unless you’re going through the new DTRPG integration) and then download it to your own machine, or server, and have a copy of it; instead of being locked in to a vendor’s site.

Foundry really does capture the essence of a tabletop better than most. And the developers there are really focused on keeping that feeling prominent in their design. They are also always thinking ahead to keep their VTT ahead of the others. It’s amazing that Foundry has only been live for 2 years. And as someone that dabbles in streaming, its aesthetics and functionality are much appreciated. It just looks great on the screen. I even have a way to let chat roll the dice and specific tables through chat commands, so there is a lot of potential for interaction with that VTT. TLDR: The people at Foundry “get it.”

How’d you get started streaming?

Originally, my stream started out as a world-building project for 5E. At some point, I wanted to explore my world a bit more organically as some of the characters but had no idea how to do that. That’s when I stumbled upon solo RPGs and Ironsworn, specifically. During my first playthrough, I was blown away. I hadn’t felt that excited by a new game since I was that 9-year-old boy I mentioned above. It was possibly the most immersive role-playing experience I ever had. And I was immediately addicted to oracles and random tables. That system has assuredly made me a better GM, and now I love playing with 25% prepared content and 75% random content derived at the table.

I think I had a very similar reaction to playing Ironsworn. I was blown away by it, and how it managed to clearly put all the negative trash about solo play in the bin. Although I’d been only solo for years at that point, I had not ever played a system designed to enable solo to quite that level of sophistication. And, holy moley, it pretty much happened to fortuitously show up on the scene just ahead of the last of the beforetimes!

I think that Ironsworn is revolutionary. Shawn Tomkin has a way of designing his tables to inspire your imagination in ways that I have never seen. His prompts are thought-provoking, and never shoehorn you into anything. It’s amazing how many times you roll on The Oracle and the results just fit perfectly into the narrative or what you were expecting to happen. I like to call it “Horoscope Design.” I am sure you know someone that follows their horoscope pretty regularly and the common phrase you might hear from them is “This is so me!” Well, one of the dirty secrets about horoscopes is that if you read all of them, you can find “This is so me!” in all the signs. But don’t tell your friend that, especially if horoscopes genuinely seem to make them happy. Basically, it’s an illusion. The Oracles always seem to make sense because we make them make sense. That’s the genius of his design. He’s dangling your own creativity in front of you!

Did the great blip change how and what you play much?

Not directly. After closing the shop, I wanted to remain in the gaming industry. I was going to start down this path in time and was structuring my life in order to do so. It did get me to want to start streaming and exploring the writing aspect a bit sooner than I had planned, which ultimately led me down the path to Ironsworn and solo RPGs. But I think I would have found out about those eventually. I’m a pretty low-key and solitary guy, anyhow, so it really didn’t change my life all that much. I often joke that I was pretty much preparing for lockdowns and isolation my entire life. :)

Who are you hoping to be as a streamer?

I just want to provide a warm, welcoming place for people to hang out. I don’t expect big things from my stream; I am just not wired that way. So if you’re expecting CohhCarnage or PewDiePie, I can get you a link. But I am hoping it will provide me with a network of friends and others in the gaming industry that gives me just enough viewers to give exposure to some of the stuff I create.

Take those links and toss ‘em. I don’t want ‘em, won’t use ‘em, and won’t share ‘em. Personally, I start at the bottom of the list of people streaming something I’m interested in and work up, not start at the most popular. No one watches those at the top, they’re too popular (and often grossly problematic). /soapbox

Oh, I get it, although Cohh actually seems like a pretty good dude. I’ve watched him on and off for years now. He’s definitely earned his popularity. But yeah, I like things a little less polished and a little more raw. I like seeing underneath the hood to see how things work. It’s probably the same reason why I love tinkering with different mechanics from different systems.

Any projects other than streaming you want to mention? Any hobbies or interests you want to mention?

I’ll talk about the projects a bit below. As for hobbies and passions… I am a baseball junkie, although I no longer play. I love my cats. Board games are also a passion of mine. And I love watching paranormal shows on YouTube, and even used to investigate the paranormal for about 4 years.

Really? Got any stories about your paranormal investigations?

I had a major personal experience when I was a young boy, but I’ll save that one for another conversation. Let’s just say that experience conflicted with my logical brain, so I am always looking for answers. But yes, I did have a couple other experiences while investigating that were pretty terrifying. Mostly EVPs that weren’t heard until playing back recordings. I once investigated a friend’s house (her house was actually once featured on The Dead Files). We had 2 cameras and 4 digital recorders. There were several EVPs caught that night. I’ll send them to you if you’re interested, but one stood out. I was looking at her yearbooks sitting on a bookshelf. We went to the same high school. And at that point, one recorder caught “Chippewa Valley,” which was the high school we both went to (and hence, the yearbooks I was eyeing). We were the only two in the basement at the time, and it was caught on the recorder furthest away from me, but none of the other devices. It’s as clear as day. Just creepy.

Wormhole X-treme! Ghostfacers! *looking over at the box set for West End Games’ Ghostbusters International on my shelf*

I know, right? I mean, I’m a skeptic by nature, but there are things that have happened that I just can’t explain.

What’s your current setup like for streaming? Or, what stuff are you hoping to have for your streaming setup?

Rigaroga Odd Order Interview Dice T Streaming Setup Streamer Desk

It’s a humble little spot with a couple of monitors. Always a little too messy. I’m still on a 980ti graphics card. It still handles most everything I throw at it, except for streaming some of the most demanding games. So that’s an upgrade I will need soon. I don’t play PC games like I used to, so I’m not in too big of a rush. My favorite part is my chair. It’s a huge comfy recliner with enough room for my cats on each arm or back. And it’s probably a bit too comfortable at times, as I often catch myself sliding partially out of view of the camera.

Ugh, yeah. I tend to lean awkwardly to one side if I’m not careful. Looks awful on camera! Also, it’s awful for my back … Just one of the bazillion things to keep track of when streaming that one doesn’t normally have to think about! (Except that I should think more about my posture all the time, tbh.)

Yeah, I’ll be working on that more. I just like lounging. Hahaha.

What have been your primary resources for information as you’ve been getting ready to stream regularly, on how to do it and set it all up?

I am a rules-tinkerer and I love trying to plug neat systems into existing rulesets to see how they synergize, if at all. So mostly it involves surrounding myself with different rules systems and content. And Discord servers that are home to my favorite games. I have tons of PDFs filled with random tables, so I should add DriveThruRPG to that list. A lot of this is still very new to me, so I stumble and fumble around a bit. Even as a tech guy, it’s pretty demanding to be properly prepped.

Have you gotten any advice about starting to stream that you’ve taken to heart?

Stay engaged with your viewers. This is pretty hard for me, and it’s a work in progress. When I am immersed in something, my focus is on that something. And I am not very good at narrating my thoughts, as a result. I do plan on starting a Starforged playthrough soon, in which I co-op with chat. It’s going to be an interesting experiment and there is going to be a really fun twist early on. So I am hoping that will help facilitate my engagement with them.

It really is a trip how much extra thought goes into all the streaming things. Not to even mention Murphy’s Law for streaming that something will always break when you press the button. I didn’t understand until I did it myself, how I suddenly somehow seem to feel instantly much dumber once the stream starts!

Yeah, for sure. And that doesn’t even get into setting up lighting, sound, scenes, bots, and any editing that may go into it after. That doesn’t even cover all of it.

It’s all a big learning journey not a destination, one might say. Getting a little bit better each time is part of the fun, I feel.

For sure. What’s the saying, “Not all those that wander are lost?”

What stuff have you played, what are you playing now, and what do you want to play?

Oh, gosh. That list is really long. From D&D to Shadowrun to Rifts to Traveller to Call of Cthulhu to Dangerous Journeys and everything in between. I do love board games, also. Right now, I am heavy into solo RPGs like Ironsworn and Starforged. I am looking forward to playing Disciples of Bone & Shadow and Across A Thousand Dead Worlds. Both games are designed as solo RPGs, but can be played co-op or with a GM. I really want to get my hands on Strider Mode for The One Ring.

My own to-play stack of shame could crush an ox, luckily it’s mostly virtual. Way more than I’ll ever actually get around to, if I’m honest. If prep is play then thinking about playing them is playing them, I hope I can uncomfortably claim in my defense. And, yeah, by the way, from my gander through the Strider Mode booklet, it is cool, and it really doesn’t change things as much as I feared it might. I kinda thought it might end up being a different solo-style game layered on top of the theme from the normal game, but it’s really very thoughtful and doesn’t seem to make any huge changes. Job well done, I think, on that, but I haven’t yet gotten to the table with it either.

Well, get on that. Until they release it to the masses, I have to live vicariously through you!

What goals do you have for the future with your stream and tabletop gaming?

A lot of this is still a work in progress, but I really love providing tools and systems for people to create with. I am currently in the beginning stages of a project I am calling Anvil and Loom, which looks to really expand upon what I learned while developing the Starforged system for Foundry. The foundation of it is content generation and prompts meant to spark the player’s imagination, so these tools would be very useful for solo RPGers and DMs, especially. With it, you would generate something (a wilderness area, a dungeon room, a town, a planet, whatever) and you would get a “first glance” at that something. If it interests you and you want to explore more, then you take a “deep dive” with tools designed to provide more detailed information. But this information is both generic and specific; it’s meant for the player to expand upon and fill in the narrative. It is truly inspired by Shawn Tomkin’s work with Ironsworn and Starforged, as he is a master of this concept.

Interesting trivia about Anvil and Loom… in the mid-1800s, the US had an Almanac titled The Plough, The Loom, and The Anvil. “The Anvil” covers mechanics while “The Loom” covers narrative. Since learning about this Almanac, I have been trying to figure out how to fit “The Plough” into this. But I really love the aesthetics of the cover, so I may use it as a source of design inspiration. The inside isn’t much to look at, but the cover is gorgeous. I’ve got some time, though. It’s still a ways off. Hahaha.

Rigaroga Odd Order interview Dice T The Plow the Loom and the Anvil

I once had a NeXTStep developer I knew tell me, seriously, that the most important part of a program was the About dialog, so … heck, why not start with an inspiring cover!? But, that sounds like an interesting idea. I’ll enjoy hearing more when there is more to tell about it.

Any last words?

Stories. When it’s all said and done, all we are are stories.

Ironsworn map size comparisons

Back in 2020, if I recall correctly, Shawn Tomkin mentioned something that gave me a scale for the Ironsworn map, and, although I don’t recall more about what was said, I did go and make some scale comparisons to Middle Earth, a few real world maps, and also Greyhawk for fun, and since there were some discussions online about trying to conceptualize the size of the Ironlands, these might be helpful, or at least interesting.

Since then I deleted and then recreated my Twitter account, [and deleted it again, again!] so those aren’t online anywhere I can point to anymore. Welp, okay. Here they are!

I started with the comparison between Middle Earth and the Ironlands.

Ironsworn to Middle Earth

And here’s the distance from the Shire to Mount Doom, as the crow flies.

Ironsworn to Middle Earth as the crow flies

Then, I did some comparisons to real world maps. There’s a bunch, so here’s a gallery.

Finally, because I’m an old school nerd, I also did one last comparison, between Ironlands and the Greyhawk region of Oerth.

Ironsworn to Greyhawk region of Oerth

The Tales of Mukoda, Session 1

Here’s a summary of a continuing story, The Tales of Mukoda, a series of actual play in an ongoing persistent solo roleplaying campaign, with my character Mukoda ha’Varou, using Ironsworn and Ironsworn: Delve, and other parts of the system. You can see all of my actual play sessions in the Ironsworn playlist over on my YouTube channel, and consider following me over on Twitter or Instagram as well, or check out all the other things.

This campaign journal entry covers session 1, which is episodes 4–10 of actual play in the video playlist.

Session 1

Welcome to the world of Ironsworn! But, why does it have to be me?

On the world, in the Ironlands, somewhere near nowhere, there is where we begin. Living recently in a dying Ironlander circle community, inside-outsider Mukoda ha’Varou is already swearing iron vows and getting into trouble in Stonetower.

The situation in Stonetower becomes complicated quickly as Mukoda learns more about an ongoing Varou threat. For a dying circle, there sure is a lot already going on around here. And then true enemy is revealed!

A Haunt coalesced on the Stonetower ceremonial mace. Mukoda travels to the Varou, who have the Stonetower ceremonial mace, then convinces them to allow a ritual to break the Haunting bond.

But, the Haunt joins in the ritual keening song and takes angry form in front of all. Mukoda battles the Haunt whilst the Varou are all held sway, unable to break free on their own volition.

Barely surviving the bitter fought battle, Mukoda yet successfully defeats the spirit keened from the Stonetower ceremonial mace. Now fellow Varou are freed from the frightening Haunt’s influence. Mukoda is emboldened and the way forward is made clear but iron vows are demanded.

Stonetower ceremonial mace is returned, and the tale told. Warden and community are compelled to pack up and dissolve, but Stonetower’s dark secret is revealed. Mukoda is sworn to convince the Varou of Stonetower community sorrow and make amends. In return for forgiveness, Varou demand Mukoda swear to become a protector of their community and their marks that claim this territory. Mukoda requests to join, but is rejected by Wardens.

A final sojourn is made in Stonetower whilst community disbands the circle’s ceremonial claim to that place. Of Ironlander circle’s presence at Stonetower nothing but memories and detritus sustains. Stonetower itself now appears an empty and unclaimed husk, not much more than just structure seems to remain. Mukoda returns to Stonetower Varou and becomes part of their community as promised, learning more about their shared ancestry and culture. And, stories hinting at new future troubles to explore are heard.

To Be Continued

But, what have I recently learned?

Read the more at The Tales of Mukoda, Session 1 Lore

The Tales of Mukoda, Worldbuilding and Truths

Here’s a summary of a continuing story, The Tales of Mukoda, a series of actual play in an ongoing persistent solo roleplaying campaign, with my character Mukoda ha’Varou, using Ironsworn and Ironsworn: Delve, and other parts of the system. You can see all of my actual play sessions in the Ironsworn playlist over on my YouTube channel, and consider following me over on Twitter or Instagram as well, or check out all the other things.

This campaign journal entry covers worldbuilding and truths, which is essentially the second part of session 0.

Worldbuilding and Truths

Welcome to the world of Ironsworn! But, what is this world where I am?

As a reminder, I consider this part of session 0 to be, essentially, a cross-table conversation that includes others in my own thinking about worldbuilding, and that I’ve been informed by the solo actual play series by Adam Koebel and Mark Hulmes, and the co-operative actual play by All Systems Go. Think of these as cross-tabletop inspiration and dialogue for the worldbuilding and truths for my solo play!

The Old World

The sickness moved like a horrible wave across the Old World, killing all in its path. Thousands fled aboard ships. However, the plague could not be outrun. On many ships, the disease was contained through ruthless measures—tossing overboard any who exhibited the slightest symptom. Other ships were forever lost. In the end, those who survived found the Ironlands and made it their new home. Some say we will forever be cursed by those we left behind.

Quest Starter: A settlement is stricken by disease. Though this sickness bears some similarities to the Old World plague, it doesn’t kill its victims. Instead, it changes them. How does this disease manifest? Why do you swear to seek out a cure?

This is particularly interesting right now, so I’ll be informed by the overall COVID-19 pandemic; very timely and current. Lot’s there to explore. But, I’m also reminded of discussion from Barbara Tuchman’s A Distant Mirror, where I learned about the way in which the Black Plague caused not only lots of death, but what came after that: a great deal of movable and immovable wealth that was available and unclaimed, ripe for concentration to those who survived. There was a kind of feeding frenzy on what was left behind and apparent increase in personal wealth for those who lived and were able to claim it.

The Old World illness means that not all who sailed to the Ironlands survived the journey, or lived long after arriving. There may be entire boats that crashed on the coasts filled only with dead and unclaimed belongings. Other landings may have lasted long enough to start settlements, but then failed and have left ghost towns behind. Those communities that made the journey and managed to survive are now filled with fear and paranoia about sickness.

Perhaps part of what happened in Stonetower is that it finally fell to illness, or the fear of illness.

Some circles may be holed-up, being very rapacious and holding on to wealth, and keeping other people out; and there may be others that are empty and abandoned; and so on.

Not to make light of pandemics, in general, or COVID-19, specifically, but this seems timely to play around with these ideas.

Iron

Inscrutable metal pillars are found throughout the land. They are iron gray, and smooth as river stone. No one knows their purpose. Some say they are as old as the world. Some, such as the Iron Priests, worship them and swear vows upon them. Most make the warding sign and hurry along their way when they happen across one. The pillars do not tarnish, and even the sharpest blade cannot mark them.

Quest Starter: Your dreams are haunted by visions of a pillar which stands in an unfamiliar landscape. What do you see? Why are you sworn to seek it out?

I think definitely building off of all the conversations from the cross-table inspiration I’ve mentioned, I feel like these pillars are “Bones of the Earth”. There’s these mysterious iron pillars all over the Ironlands, and maybe they are on ley-lines, but it’s kind of apophenic, meaning you can’t quite tell if there’s a pattern. You can’t really tell if there’s a pattern, Every time you think you’ve discovered a pattern, further observation falsifies that idea; but they still seem to be in some as yet unrealized pattern.

Building on the “Bones of the Earth” idea, these pillars are phenomenally hard on the outside, but there is actually a kind of molten metal in the middle. The Old World was Bronze Age, but we’ve now got these iron pillars that can be tapped, like maple syrup, and you can get molten metal, iron, out of them, to use. Maybe we can’t ever or only rarely scratch the outside of these pillars, but every once in a while there’s cracks, or maybe rarely with enough force a crack appears and you can tap into a pillar and get this substance out.

I think there’s also some mystic effect to these pillars, similar to the discussion about them by All Systems Go. I don’t mention in the video, but I can definitely imagine some Land of the Lost kind of Pylon thing going on with some pillars, or maybe those appear some other way. But, there’s some way that the pillars cause Ironlanders to go a bit crazy, maybe the pillars have caused previous waves of now vanished Old World settlements to collapse. The pillars, perhaps being on, or forming themselves, some kind of ley-line network, are how the Ironlands are imbued with not only iron, but also mystic energy, effects, and anomalies.

There’s a lot to build on with these implications and possibilities that come from the metaphor of “Bones of the Earth”.

Legacies

Other humans sailed here from the Old World untold years ago, but all that is left of them is a savage, feral people we call the broken. Is their fate to become our own?

Quest Starter: You find a child—one of the broken. It is wounded, and hunted by others of its kind. Do you protect it, even at the risk of inviting the wrath of the broken tribes?

Before the Ironlanders, before even the firstborn, another people lived here. Their ancient ruins are found throughout the Ironlands.

Quest starter: Miners uncovered an underground ruin. Thereafter, the people of the settlement are haunted by strange dreams. The ruins call to them, they say. Several have disappeared in that dark, ancient place— including someone important to you.

I definitely want both of these legacies to be true. I feel that the other humans succumbed to the effect of the iron pillars, and the mystic energy of the Ironlands; I’m thinking here of the broken being like Morlocks, and the newest wave of humans as Eloi; something to discover and a theme to explore. I also definitely want there to be ancient ruins all through the Ironlands, with a complex mysterious pre-history.

Communities

We are few in number in this accursed land. Most rarely have contact with anyone outside our own small steading or village, and strangers are viewed with deep suspicion.

Quest Starter: In the dead of winter, a desperate man arrives at a snowbound steading. He is wounded, hungry, and nearly frozen to death. His family has been taken. By whom? Will you brave the merciless winter to save them?

We live in communities called circles. These are settlements ranging in size from a steading with a few families to a village of several hundred. Some circles belong to nomadic folk. Some powerful circles might include a cluster of settlements. We trade (and sometimes feud) with other circles.

Quest Starter: A decades-long feud between two circles has flared into open conflict. What is the cause of this dispute? Do you join in the fight, or swear to put a stop to it?

I don’t think there are any big cities yet, and we’re at the point where there may be a couple of larger communities, or clusters of circles, starting to form; but for the most part there are only small circles that have formed, lots of little outposts, loosely connected by infrequent trade and pony express style communication systems. There would likely be more circles along the coasts, staying nearer to where they landed. Of all places, the Havens are where the most expansion into the interior has occurred.

Also, circles are not really tied to specific location, although they can stay in one place, but they are tied together by their community. Some circles are nomadic. And, they can pack up and move, sometimes.

Each circle has their different quirks, and are mostly isolated from other circles.

Leadership

Leadership is as varied as the people. Some communities are governed by the head of a powerful family. Or, they have a council of elders who make decisions and settle disputes. In others, the priests hold sway. For some, it is duels in the circle that decide.

Quest Starter: You have vivid reoccurring dreams of an Ironlands city. It has strong stone walls, bustling markets, and a keep on a high hill. And so many people! Nowhere in the Ironlands does such a city exist. In your dreams, you are the ruler of this city. Somehow, no matter how long it takes, you must make this vision a reality.

I feel like leadership is varied from circle to circle, and depends on how the circle formed, and the people in the circle.

Defense

The wardens are our soldiers, guards, and militia. They serve their communities by standing sentry, patrolling surrounding lands, and organizing defenses in times of crisis. Most have strong ties to their community. Others, called free wardens, are wandering mercenaries who hire on to serve a community or protect caravans.

Quest Starter: You come upon a dying warden. She tells you of an important mission, and charges you with its completion. “Swear to me,” she says, reaching out with a bloodied hand to give you an object crucial to the quest. What is it?

I really like this. There are a number of inspirations for me for this. I want a Yojimbo, wandering ronin kind of deal; wandering into a community, and getting hired by one faction or another; moving from community to community. I also feel like Wardens are kind of militarized traders, who travel with trade caravans but are also really well funded. Their kind of Knights Templar-ish. They go around and do the Witcher kind of thing, with Monster of the Week, discover the big bad and defeat it, but they also do occasionally team up and do The Three (or Four) Musketeer things.

But Wardens are also a kind of fraternal organization, like a Knight Templar or Freemason, Wardens have fraternal bonds where they can go to any new community without previous relationships, but have that bond with the Wardens to rely on; inspired a bit by Revolutionary Brotherhood, which discusses in part how one of the changing roles of Freemasonry was to create a social support network of strangers as immigrant Europeans expanded toward westward travelling to new communities alone.

Freewardens are the travelling version, where Wardens are tied to a circle in some way.

Mysticism

Some still find comfort in the old ways. They call on mystics to divine the fortune of their newborn, or ask them to perform rituals to invoke a bountiful harvest. Others act out of fear against those who they suspect of having power. However, most folk believe true magic—if it ever existed— is lost to us now.

Quest Starter: Someone close to you is accused of cursing a settlement, causing fields to go fallow and cattle to become sick. What is the evidence of this? Will you defend this person and uncover the true cause of the settlement’s troubles?

Magic is rare and dangerous, but those few who wield the power are truly gifted.

Quest Starter: You have heard stories of someone who wields true power. They live in an isolated settlement far away. Who told you of this mystic? Are they feared or respected? Why do you swear to seek them out?

Magic courses through this land as the rivers flow through the hills. The power is there for those who choose to harness it, and even the common folk often know a helpful ritual or two.

Quest Starter: Someone you love walked the paths of power, and succumbed to it. Who are they? Why did they fall into darkness? Where are they now? Do you seek to save them or defeat them?

I think there’s some of all three of these going on. I don’t think there are Merlins. Or, maybe one or two, but still very rare and mythical? There aren’t any organized Hogwarts-style structures. What we’re tending more towards a more pervasive folkloric mysticism. Kind of like the Celtic Catholicism in Secret of Roan Inish. Superstitious, ritualistic kinds of mysticism. I think everyone knows there are these effects, but it’s very folkloric and not very clear to most people how it works.

There’s a kind of Andromedia Klein style magical realism, where things one does have effect, but the causal link is always not completely clear. The folkloric mysticism of the Ironlands is rooted in the world, and “does not often include overtly fantastic or magical content, but rather looks at the mundane through a hyper-realistic and often mysterious lens.”

But, at some point, I also imagine things will get more complicated, with complex rituals being possible. Some people maybe have a kind of Myth Adventures style core ability in a concrete non-obfuscated way to grab the energy of pillars, ley-lines, and soever for wild effects.

I think, like the iron of the pillars, and probably very connected to them, the Old World didn’t have iron or magic either. No one in the Old World knew that magic existed until arriving in the Ironlands.

Religion

I’m going to go a bit off on my own tangent with this one. I have zero interest in there being any complex organized religion, definitely nothing like Roman Catholicism.

In the same way that there is in Cosmicism, there’s the Elder Gods, Old Gods, and people; and in the Theogony of the Ancient Greeks, with Primordial, Titan, Gods, then Household Gods; and soever.

For this, I’m thinking that what is thought of as Gods are structured linguistically. I’m not entirely sure how this will work, and I’m not thinking this all is very present. I may not explore it much? But, I think the oldest, most alien Gods are Nouns, so like the Elder Gods. Then there are Old Gods, Verbs. And then there are New Gods, which are Adjectives; Demi-gods, adverbs; and personal Gods, maybe, are, like, Pronouns (See what I did there?!), and maybe household Gods are Prepositions and so on.

I don’t think religion is super present. There aren’t Gods thundering over everyone. And, I don’t think there’s an organized priesthood. Maybe there was in the Old World, but it got so fractured on the way or in the Ironlands that there isn’t much left.

I think there’s also maybe some American Gods style Old Gods from the Old World and New Gods from this place, being found in Ironlands. Some, perhaps the Verbs, were brought with us, but the Old Gods we didn’t know about, the Nouns, were already hidden and behind things, and there’s New Gods from this place, Adjective and Adverbs, being discovered or being revealed.

I feel like the praxis of all these entities is more like Shinto than Roman Catholicism. I have no interest in having an organized Christianity in my imaginary world. But people feel these powers, and perhaps feel empowered by them in this place, by their relationships with these entities, these concepts. Like the Prometheans are like Forethought; and Huginn and Muninn are Thought and Memory; these abstract concepts are personified in an entity, a collectively created, generated entities. As they have power in these Ironlands, they have start to have real effects in the real world, that have started to coalesce and have real stuff happen. I even think, perhaps, that in the Old World this wasn’t at all true, and these are new experiences of having these real effects and real relationships have only started occurring in the Ironlands.

Firstborn

The firstborn live in isolation and are fiercely protective of their own lands.

Quest Starter: The elf, outcast from his kind, lives with Ironlanders. Over time, he became a part of the community. Now, he is dying. He yearns to return to his people before he passes. Does he seek absolution or justice? Why do you swear to help him? What force opposes his return?

There are definitely the various Firstborn (Primordials, Giants, Elves, Varou, and all those creatures, communities, and cultures) that exist. But I don’t think they necessarily are constantly present, or everyone is aware of them. Just ike our circles trade but aren’t in constant communication, and they Freewardens are more aware of the Firstborn than the general population, because they travel and have more contact; like the Night’s Watch is more aware of the threat in the North. The Firstborn are not abandoned or gone; they are definitely here. They are not specifically in isolation, but it just happens that everyone in the Ironlands is in isolation.

Beasts

Monstrous beasts stalk the wild areas of the Ironlands.

Quest Starter: A prominent Ironlander is consumed with the need to bring vengeance upon a specific beast. What makes this creature distinctive? How did it earn the wrath of this Ironlander? Do you aid this person in their quest, or act to prevent their blind hate from destroying more than just the beast?

I think Beasts are like the Forest Spirit and Boar Spirit in Princess Mononoke. These are the ideal, exemplar, heroic versions of the animals. They exist. I think most people know they exist, but they are rare. Every once in a while there’s a clash or something happens that rouses the exemplar to show up and make itself known.

Horrors

We are wary of dark forests and deep waterways, for monsters lurk in those places. In the depths of the long-night, when all is wreathed in darkness, only fools venture beyond their homes.

Quest Starter: You bear the scars of an attack by a horror. What was it? Are those scars physical, emotional, or both? How do you seek to make yourself whole again?

I think I got this confused a little with Monstrosities in Delve. But, these awful things exist. The horrors, the mutants, the cosmic horrors are out there, maybe in the ruins, maybe near pillars. These will be more rare, like boss fights, as I play.

To Be Continued

But, why does it have to be me?

Read the more at The Tales of Mukoda, Session 1

The Tales of Mukoda, Character Creation

Here’s a summary of a continuing story, The Tales of Mukoda, a series of actual play in an ongoing persistent solo roleplaying campaign, with my character Mukoda ha’Varou, using Ironsworn and Ironsworn: Delve, and other parts of the system. You can see all of my actual play sessions in the Ironsworn playlist over on my YouTube channel, and consider following me over on Twitter or Instagram as well, or check out all the other things.

This campaign journal entry covers character creation, which is essentially the first part of session 0.

Character Creation

Welcome to the world of Ironsworn! But, who am I in this world?

Inspired by Adam Koebel’s Half-Elf character, I started to think about another First Born ancestry: Varou. I’ve decided to be Half-Varou.

I use the Oracle to workshop a name, and come up with Mukoda. I decide my full name includes my ancestry and is Mukoda ha’Varou.

Thinking about character stats, I struggled a bit, because all of the stats seem “wolf” like to me, but I settle on 2 Edge, 3 Heart, 2 Iron, 1 Shadow, 1 Wits. I’m thinking that this character isn’t inherently very sneaky or deceptive, nor particularly knowledgeable or observant. I felt that I’d like to be reasonably quick and agile, as well as reasonably physical and able to endure; I’m equally skilled in both ranged and close quarters combat, but not super great at either. What I have in most abundance is courage and willpower, and social skills to match; probably something I gained whilst trying to navigate the world as someone with mixed heritage.

Mukoda ha'Varou character stats

I set my starting Health, Spirit, Supply, and Momentum where they all are at when fresh, prepared, and ready to go.

For my initial long term goal, I decide that I want to have a character that has realized the barest beginning of mysticism and the powers that knowledge makes available. I think I’ll start out with at least one Ritual, but that I want to find out more. Finding out more is a process that I’m not sure about yet. I’ll figure that out later. But, the Path itself involves fulfilling an formidable, or harder, iron vow in service to an elder mystic just to become a Ritualist, and gain the Asset.

I decide this background vow’s overall difficulty is Extreme. I’ll figure out more about what this looks like later too.

I ask the Oracle for a settlement name, and the response is Stonetower. This will be an Ironlander settlement where I think I will begin my tales, though I know nothing else about the world or where this settlement is in the world, yet.

My first two bonds are with people I’ve met so far. The first is with a bandit, who wants to advance their status. They are sociable, bold, and stoic. This bandit I know is an Ironlander named Katja. The second bond is with a trader, who wants to defend a place. They are attractive, armed, and insensitive. This trader I know is also an Ironlander named Ikram. I’ve met Katja and Ikram as I’ve travelled on the road, and have at time been on either side of the perennial, universal conflict between bandits and traders. I’m not sure yet how they feel about each other, but it could go either way!

I decide that my third bond will be with the Stonetower community. Since this is an Ironlander community, I will be an inside-outsider. I have mixed ancestry, but I’m probably mostly familiar with Ironlander culture as that is who I’ve been around most growing up. There will likely be a lot of tension around my mixed heritage throughout my ongoing campaign, as something to play around with as continue.

I’ve been living in community with Stonetower, trying to experience what it is like to be more settled and have roots in a particular location. My mixed heritage has been increasingly troublesome as there’s been an ongoing conflict with a nearby Varou community. Some Ironlanders in Stonetower feel like I’m a spy or advanced scout for the Varou, but others feel that I must step up as an ambassador to stop the conflict with “my people”. There’s a lot of personal tension with the community around this.

However, the Oracle tells me that Stonetower, as a community is dead, civilized, and abandoned. There’s not much left here. The Ironlanders are the last dregs, trying to survive as a struggling outpost whilst still keeping up appearances, due to most of population leaving for elsewhere on account of the Varou danger.

I decide that I may explore having or developing a relationship with the Warden, or Freewarden, in this community, possibly seeking to become part of that group. But I’ll find out more about what Wardens look like during Worldbuilding later.

I next draft out cards from the Assets deck to see what randomly happens. Three Rituals: Keen, Leech, and Lightbearer. All three are ones that I was actually considering! Reflecting on these in relation to Mukoda as a character, I settle on the ritual Keen as one of my three starting Assets, especially since it relates to the Varou Keth blade from my heritage. I also realize that my stats probably aren’t ideal for Rituals, as perhaps I should have had more Wits, but I’m okay being sub-, or quasi-optimal.

Mukoda ha'Varou character Ritual Keen

I consider Companions, but am not super excited about them now. Next I run through the plethora of Paths and Combat Talents, and think about them in combination with my particular character. I settle on adding the Combat Talent: Cutthroat and Path: Wildblood to finish rounding out my starting three Assets.

Mukoda ha'Varou character Combat Talent Cutthroat

Mukoda ha'Varou character Path Wildblood

I think these fit very well with what I imagine to be Mukoda’s life up until now, on the hard scrabble and bloody dusty road as a Half-Varou.

Finally, I also decide to narratively provide myself with my keth, a curved Varou dagger, which I gained in my youth, as part of a rite of passage required before becoming an adult Varou. With that comes some narrative imperatives, such as that I had at least enough cultural contact with my Varou heritage to have undergone this ritual, in some fashion. I’ll find out more about that later, no doubt!

To Be Continued

But, what is this world where I am?

Read the more at The Tales of Mukoda, Worldbuilding and Truths

The Tales of Mukoda, Introduction and Shout-outs

Here’s a summary of a continuing story, The Tales of Mukoda, a series of actual play in an ongoing persistent solo roleplaying campaign, with my character Mukoda ha’Varou, using Ironsworn and Ironsworn: Delve, and other parts of the system. You can see all of my actual play sessions in the Ironsworn playlist over on my YouTube channel, and consider following me over on Twitter or Instagram as well, or check out all the other things.

This campaign journal entry covers my introduction and shout-outs, which is essentially a prelude to session 0, coming up next.

Intro and Shout-outs

Welcome to the world of Ironsworn!

“In the Ironsworn tabletop roleplaying game, you are a hero sworn to undertake perilous quests in the dark fantasy setting of the Ironlands.

Others live out their lives hardly venturing beyond the walls of their village or steading, but you are different. You will explore untracked wilds, fight desperate battles, forge bonds with isolated communities, and reveal the secrets of this harsh land.

This series is an experiment in trying to more closely follow zero-prep principles, in part because I haven’t before, but also to try to make things easier on me between sessions, and make me feel more like diving in. I have had difficulty getting to the table to play, and sometimes even actually playing even when I’ve gotten to the table ready to play. So, this is a try at making the journey a little easier.

Are you ready to swear iron vows and see them fulfilled—no matter the cost?”

I think my first exposure to Ironsworn was Geek Gamers’ two solo actual plays, a year ago: Geek Gamers’ Ironsworn playlist

What got me to finally realize I wanted to play this game was the Delve preview with Shawn Tomkin on aFistFullofDice. Delve just seemed so cool! aFistfulofDice’s Ironsworn: Delve Sneak Peek!

I also want to mention that my own thinking about worldbuilding has been informed by the solo actual play series by Adam Koebel and Mark Hulmes, and the co-operative actual play by All Systems Go. Think of these as cross-tabletop inspiration for solo play!

Also, I just want to also mention that I’ve been given a timely boost by The Arcane Library / Kelsey Dionne‘s recent email about motivation.

Check out the mini hex crawl map I’ve created and am using for this campaign, included in my minimal suggestive tactical maps collection.

As usual, in my solo RPG actual plays, I’m also using my Pyramid Arcade by Looney Labs for minimal minis, some assorted acrylic treasure gems, and the usual suspects of dice, clip board, hipster PDA, and so on. I may end up using other stuff along the way as well, but we’ll see if I need anything else.

As a final note, thanks for the track Bloody Tears by Quincas Moreira, which is provided by the creator freely for people to use in their videos.

To Be Continued

But, who am I in this world?

Read the more at The Tales of Mukoda, Character Creation